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Autonomy: The cover designs of Anarchy 1961 1970
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Autonomy: The cover designs of Anarchy 1961 1970




Tapa blanda, 336 páginas, 17.8 x 2.5 x 24.1 cm.
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Prominent among the themes of the journal were education, the urban environment, work, workers self-organization, crime, psychology, as well as anarchist traditions and history; attention was given to literature, theatre, and cinema. Although its contributors were many and diverse, Anarchy was essentially the creation of one person, Colin Ward (1924 2010). With this journal, and throughout his work as a writer, editor, and activist, Ward proposed the idea that anarchist principles of mutual aid and autonomous organization outside a centralized state can be achieved here and now and are already at work all around us. The title of this book Autonomy takes up a defining idea of anarchism, as well as using again the word that Colin Ward had intended to be the title of his journal. Autonomy gives attention for the first time to the covers of Anarchy, designed mostly by Rufus Segar. These little-known covers or wrappers front and back were often conceived as a continuous unit provided the enticing entry to the plain text pages inside. The book reproduces all of them in a sequence that suggests, incidentally, something of the history of graphic design in Britain in those years. The book gives a full picture of Anarchy. Daniel Poyner introduces the journal and its editor, and gives a transcript of his extended interview with Rufus Segar. We reprint a sparkling account of Anarchy by the late Raphael Samuel. The covers and their place in graphic design history are considered by the designer Richard Hollis. To round off the book, a full author and article index of Anarchy is provided. Autonomy writes a new chapter in graphic design history, based in a rich and unexpected source.